The six best virtual tours of Paris to take right now

More than any other city, Paris is an infatuation. It’s even a syndrome for some, who find themselves suffering from anxiety and hallucinations – or even physically sick – when the Paris they arrive in is not the romanticised City of Lights they have come to expect. The City of Lights has reached us from afar, through the imaginations of artists, writers and filmmakers. It’s picture perfect – but only from afar, because Paris is also big, dirty and prosaic like any other metropolis, and it has over 25 million visitors per year queueing outside its landmark attractions.

What Paris do you visit, then, when you take a virtual tour? That’s all anybody can do for now, after all – even Parisians, who are under a strict lockdown to slow the spread of COVID-19. (It’s scheduled to end halfway through May.) The answer depends on what you mean by “virtual tour”. Do books count? What about Zoom video calls with an experienced guide who is stuck in their apartment, just like you, even if theirs is in Paris? Or does the virtual in “virtual tour” refer to a high-tech simulation of reality, like it does in virtual reality? According to one definition, “something virtual is effective in essence but not in name,” which makes sense, but leaves the door open to virtually anything. (You’ll have to forgive me for that.)

I decided to start with the widest range of options I could uncover online, ready for me to do right now, then I rated the best of them using three criteria that you could just as easily apply to non-virtual tours:

  1. How immersive is it?
  2. How interactive is it?
  3. How in-depth is it?

Continue reading “The six best virtual tours of Paris to take right now” »

Armchair audio tours

It can feel a little bit like magic when VoiceMap tours point out a revealing detail at exactly the right moment, to show you something you’d normally walk by without a sideways glance. But it’s actually a spell that has been carefully produced by our editors, who help every single one of our publishers with the ins and outs of automatic GPS playback.

That’s why we’re surprised by our data, which suggests that for a surprising number of VoiceMap’s listeners, automatic playback doesn’t matter at all. In fact, over the last 12 months, about 15% of them have started tours more than 100 kilometres from their starting points. And about a quarter have used the VoiceMap app’s Continuous Play feature, which is designed for listeners who might be at home washing the dishes, or on their way to work – or on an aeroplane at the start of a trip.

How to use VoiceMap like an audio book or podcast

The starting point screen for Annie Sargent's tour Montmartre: More than Meets the Eye.
The starting point screen for Annie Sargent’s tour Montmartre: More than Meets the Eye. Continuous Play is at the bottom right.

There are three ways to play a VoiceMap tour once you’ve downloaded it:

  1. Start Tour, which has a button that activates when you’re close to the starting point
  2. Resume, which starts the tour at the location closest to you, wherever you are
  3. Continuous Play

If you select either Start Tour or Resume, VoiceMap uses automatic GPS playback. After audio at one location ends, you only hear the next location’s audio when you get there – or you skip tracks manually. Continuous Play works differently: GPS playback is disabled, and the tour plays one location after the other, from beginning to end. Continue reading “Armchair audio tours” »